I.C.E. and the Taper Plan

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I. (Ice)

C. (Compression)

E. (Elevation)

The name of my game.

Hi Friends.  (Insert downcast voice here)  Unfortunately my shin is hurting again, I believe due to my race Sunday.  Bummer.  Definitely should’ve taken the time to ice, stretch, etc.  But, there was a swim class to get to with my Baby so there was no time for that. Then, I was SUPER sore Monday and thought it to be a good idea to do 5 shake down miles to “get the blood” flowing in order to be abel to stretch out.  I probably should’ve done one mile then stretched it out.  Grrrrr. I HATE injury.  I took yesterday off thinking it would help, but a little too late I believe.  I felt great during my seven miler today but immediately after cool down was feeling the pain again.  SO, with my race three weeks away, here is my plan… I will take off tomorrow (Thursdays are normal rest days for me anyway due to crazy schedules). Friday I will cross train (take a spin class) and put no pressure on it. Saturday I will take off.  Then Sunday, I will attempt my long run (again, only three weeks left before race and I can’t really bear to throw away all of my training thus far).  As a side bar, this is interesting information from HRGs blog about “losing running fitness…” (From Hansen’s Marathon Method)

1-2 days missed: “Training can resume normally without scaling back mileage or intensity. You lose a couple days of running; no harm done.   While a number of missed workouts can spell your doom for your marathon goals, a single lost workout will never be your demise.”

3-6 days missed: There will be very small physiological regressions from taking this many days off.  ”After 3-4 days of missed training, come back slowly by running easy for 2-3 days, then pick the schedule back up and follow it as usual.  If 5-6 days are missed, run easy for 3-4 days and then revert to the previous week’s training regimen.”

7-10 days missed:  ”At this point the body starts to lose some of those hard-earned physiological gains you have made.  Keep in mind that if you can still manage to run some short, easy runs during this period and have the go-ahead from your doctor, the time it takes to return to normal training will be significantly less.  If running isn’t possible, commit to cross training to prevent a drop-off in fitness. Upon your return to running, you should run easy for the same number of days that were missed.”

More than 10 days missed:  ”After two weeks of lost training, the decrease in physiological gains are quite significant- as much as 3-5%  After 21 days away from running, 10% or more of fitness is forfeited.”

“The key to cross training during injury is to find an activity that mimics running as closely as possible, such as using an elliptical or a stationary bike.”

 ANYWAY, I  will reassess at that point to see if I can handle the long run on Sunday.  It is supposed to be 12.  If not, I will adjust.  OK, so that brings me to my taper plan.  For long races (anything over 10K-for 10k I just take the day off before, although maybe I should reassess given my latest injuries) such as a half marathon, you need to taper.  The miles you don’t run are just as important and the ones you do in a successful training plan.  I did a bunch of research via the trusty www, and picked the taper plan I felt would make my race the most successful.  I didn’t want to taper TOO much (I love running) but I also wanted to be fresh and avoid injury.  Anyway, The taper plan I chose to follow was from active.com and endurancesportsinsitute.com.  The gist from ACTIVE is:

Half-Marathon

Start cutting your mileage two weeks before the race. The first week, run 75 percent of your normal mileage; the final week, run 50 percent. The first week, run 4 x 800 meters at your 10K race pace with a 400-meter jog between repeats.

The final week, run 4 x 400 meters at 5K race pace with a 200-meter jog between repeats. A few days before the race, jog two miles, then run 6 to 8 x 100-meter strides at 90 percent effort.

On track days: 1) Wear the shoes you plan to use in the marathon; 2) jog four laps before and after the workout; 3) walk or jog slowly during the recovery interval.

On “easy” days: 1) Run no faster than marathon goal pace; and 2) add walking breaks if you plan to walk at times during the marathon.

On rest days: Don’t even cross-train. Rest.

So, my taper plan will look like the following.  It is based on the fact that I run average 30 miles a week during most of my training:

2 weeks out (week of 3/31-4/6)> 75% (22 miles total) Long run=9 (33% less of longest run to taper long run)

– 4×800 (half miles) at 10k pace with 400s jog repeats (1/4 mile) in between

1 week out (4/7>4/13)>50% (15 miles total), long run being in the beginning of that week, 6 miles (reduced by another 33% of longest)

-4×400 (1/4 miles) at 5k pace with 200s jog repeats in between

Anyway, that is my general plan.

AAAND, in one more piece of running news, my stats from Sunday somehow changed (?)…

Original:

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New:

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14>16 and 64>68 but 32=32 LOL.  Oh, and this:

get your rear in gear 2013

SO, that was a lot of running nitty gritty!  Now for your daily dose of cuteness:)

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